Tag: marijuana legalization

Mexico’s Supreme Court Green Lights Pathway Towards Legalization

Sure to upset Mexico’s Sinaloa drug cartel and “El Chapo” Guzmán, yesterday was a great day for supporters of medical marijuana and those who support the outright legalization of pot south of the border.

On Wednesday, Mexico’s Supreme Court decided that prohibiting the cultivation and consumption of marijuana for personal use was unconstitutional. Potentially setting in motion the legalization of marijuana in Mexico. In a legal ruling handed down on Wednesday, Justice Arturo Zaldívar authored an 88-page decision based on the principles of human rights – reasoning that Mexico acknowledges an individual’s freedom to participate in activities…provided they don’t harm others.

That’s right, Mexico’s highest court has now decided that prohibiting individuals from smoking weed or growing it for their own personal use violates an individual’s human rights, according to the New York Times.

The vote by the court’s criminal chamber declared that individuals should have the right to grow and distribute marijuana for their personal use. While the ruling does not strike down current drug laws, it lays the groundwork for a wave of legal actions that could ultimately rewrite them.

Mexico’s Supreme Court Green Lights Pathway Towards Legalization

Mexico’s Supreme Court Green Lights Pathway Towards Legalization

Leaving in place the existing marijuana laws for now, the court’s ruling only applies to the cannabis club that filed a lawsuit on behalf of an eight-year-old girl known as “Grace,” who became Mexico’s first medical marijuana patient in 2015.

With the court’s new ruling in hand, many in Latin America are hoping this decision will spark an important debate on South America’s overly conservative drug laws – kicking open the door for similar challenges to Mexico’s marijuana laws.

Wednesday’s ruling represents the culmination of a tireless effort from the good people at Mexico’s United Against Crime.
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Ohio aftermath: Regrouping for 2016, minus weed-grower sticking point

COLUMBUS, Ohio — The future of marijuana in Ohio was uncertain after the resounding defeat of an effort to legalize cannabis for both medical and recreational use in a single vote.

The proposal rejected by voters on Tuesday could be followed in 2016 by a more conventional legalization plan, one that doesn’t give exclusive growing rights to private investors.

Concerns about possibly creating marijuana monopolies appeared to be a major factor in its defeat.

Gov. John Kasich, a Republican presidential candidate, praised voters for their decision on marijuana.

“At a time when too many families are being torn apart by drug abuse, Ohioans said no to easy access to drugs and instead chose a path that helps strengthen our families and communities,” he said in a statement.

The marijuana question failed after an expensive campaign, a legal fight over its ballot wording and an investigation launched into the proposal’s petition signatures.

Campaign director Ian James assured supporters at a downtown Columbus gathering that the fight was not over, calling Tuesday’s defeat “a bump in the road.”

“We need to not only address compassionate care for the chronically ill, we need to also remain vigilant in protecting direct democracy,” he said. “Because when the Statehouse refuses to deal with the voters, the voters have to make them deal to make sure that their voices are heard.”

Some who voted “no” on legalization didn’t like that a small group of investors would have exclusive rights to grow pot commercially.

“I can’t believe I voted ‘no’ when it was finally on the ballot,” said Marty Dvorchak, 62, of the northern Cincinnati suburb of Fairfield. “I think it’s ridiculous that marijuana is illegal.”

University of Cincinnati student Natalie McClorey, 22, said she also didn’t like the exclusive arrangement but voted yes because it’s progress. She said she thought most students would vote the same, if they vote.

Cheryl Davis, 46, who voted in Cleveland, said she uses marijuana to help alleviate chronic pain in her back and voted in favor of legalization. Marijuana “helps me be comfortable in my daily living,” she said.
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Associated Press writers Dan Sewell in Cincinnati, Mark Gillispie in Cleveland and Ann Sanner in Columbus contributed to this report.

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Ohio Voters Snuff Out Issue 3

Seemingly more fearful of the proposed marijuana monopoly than of being arrested for pot – Ohio’s voters have snuffed out Issue 3, putting down like a rabid animal the ballot measure that would have legalized both recreational and medical marijuana for adults over the age of 21.

Trounced by a resounding 34.8% to 65.1%, the unofficial election results clearly demonstrated Ohio’s rejection of the proposed legalization framework. Comprised of a network of 10 cultivation facilities, many feel the proposed monopoly killed the optimistic polling numbers heading into the election.

Despite an October Quinnipiac poll that had shown 53% of Ohio’s voters were down with legalizing marijuana, the majority ultimately decided that Issue 3 was an ugly initiative that needed to be put out of its misery. Blaming the painful loss on the initiative’s proposed monopoly, voters like Katie Kauffeld told USA Today:

I don’t have a problem with the legalization of marijuana, I have a problem with the monopoly and the way this particular amendment was written up

While the rejection of Issue 3 smells like failure from a distance – it actually represents a thoughtful step forward. Rather than accepting legalization at any cost, Ohio’s voters have instead opted to wait for the right ballot initiative; hopefully putting the hot topic high on the To Do List for the Ohio state legislature going forward.

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